Arnold For Maya – Lights 3...

Area Light   Maya Area Light Leave as the default Intensity and Exposure value. Turn off Normalize. Scale the area light. Adjust the light effects by scaling the size. Area Light from Arnold parameter    Arnold Area Light As a default setting it renders very dim because of the quadratic fall off. Turn off Normalize. This works exactly like maya area light. But it has an additional option. That is light shape. It can be changed to cylinder, disk or quad. Mesh Light The last Arnold area light is mesh light. We are able to use any mesh within our scene as a source. Create a geometry and go to the Arnold menu and select mesh light. ( your geometry must be selected when you select the mesh light.) It will create an area light with the same shape of your geometry. You must keep your original geometry in order to use your area light. Turn off Normalize and visuality off as you wish.   Read the rest of articles Arnold for Maya – Part 1 Arnold for Maya – Part 2 Arnold for Maya – Part...

Arnold for Maya – Lights 2...

Light Filters   LightDecay changes how the light starts. The start point doesn’t have to be brightest. It can start very dark and get brighter when it gets further away. Near Attenuation Far Attenuation   Barndoor   Gobo   Light Blocker   To be continued in part 3       Read the rest of articles Arnold for Maya – Part 1 Arnold for Maya – Part 2 Arnold for Maya – Part...

Arnold for Maya – Lights 1...

This note explains how to use both the default Maya lights and Arnold specific lights in Arnold renders.   I am going to start with a default maya point light.   In the attribute editor of the point light, see  the decay type under Arnold menu: In comparison Quadratic came out very dark compared to Constant. The reason for this is the decay rate. To make it physically accurate we need to increase its intensity , exposure, radios and sample etc.   Below is an example of Exposure, radios. I increased the sample value to reduce the noise from increasing radios.   Shadow density: How density shadow should be. The default 1 as it is physically accurate. Volumetric Fog:  Enable “aiVolumescattering” in the render setting.   Default Maya light type   Directional light Exposure: we can make it brighter or darker. Angle: makes it more diffuse in the edges but the contacts are still sharp. Samples: Increasing this will reduce a lot of noise.   Spot light Using the default spot light the rendering came out really dark because of fall off. So increase the intensity and exposure as well. Adjust cone angle, penumbra Angle and drop off ( Controls the intensity base on the center to the outer edge of the light). Intensity, Exposure, Penumbra, Drop off Aspect Ratio The aspect ratio will give the light more of an anamorphic shape. Lens Radius Lens Radius is how large the light source should be. ( I have enabled the volume scattering in my shot for the demo.) To be continued in part 2   Read the rest of articles Arnold for Maya – Part 1 Arnold for Maya – Part 2 Arnold for Maya – Part...

Arnold for Maya – Image Based Lighting...

The following article explains how to use image based lighting using Arnold within Maya.   Image Based Lighting simulates light from a hemisphere or dome above the scene representing the sky. It can also be used with high dynamic range (HDR) images to perform image-based environment lighting. This is the node which is typically used for lighting exterior scenes.   Go to Arnold top and click “Lights” and then create a “SkydomeLight”. If you change the scale or position of the skydomLight it would not do anything. It would only make a difference  if we were to rotate with HDR image applied onto it. Make sure there are no lights in your Maya scene. When you render as it is you get a Gi_based render. Most of the Skydomelight property controls is within the SkydomelightShape in the attributer editor. For example color, intensity, use color temperature etc. HDR images have a greater capacity to describe light accurately (by way of floating point numbers) because they store the amount of light (rather than just color) represented in a pixel. This prevents ‘blown out’ or extremely dark areas in an image that your eyes compensate for in the natural world. How add an HDR image into the scene.     Sample: Controls the quality of the noise in the soft shadows and direct specular highlight. The higher the number of samples, the lower the noise, and the longer it takes to render. The exact number of shadow rays sent to the light is the square of this value multiplied by the AA samples.   In my case, this AA increase allows me to decrease the other sampling rates (GI/glossy/light) to compensate. To sum up, I get almost the same render time with AA=1 and GI=9 than with AA=9...